Post-Abortion Syndrome – the ultimate empty nest phenomenon…

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There is always an air of urgency surrounding the entire abortion issue – because it is literally a matter of life and death. Legal access to abortion ensures the continuing destruction of unborn children – no one in their right mind can deny this. Less well understood is the impact that abortion has on the post-abortive mother and father, living siblings, grandparents, and society as a whole, which witnesses a callous disregard for human rights and enshrines it in law.

Post-abortion syndrome covers a range of mental-health issues, from addictions and depression, increased likelihood of subsequent abortions, inability to sustain meaningful, intimate relationships, through to suicidal tendencies. Relationships with living biological children of the post-abortive woman may be affected, and the syndrome could possibly be extended to cover those living siblings who suffer from a type of “survivor-guilt.” Maternal death rates increase for the post-abortive woman. Panic attacks and anxiety are common.Many post-abortive women claim to experience feelings of being “forced” or “coerced” into having their abortion – surely this is the polar opposite of the “empowerment” promised by the pro-choice movement.

The results from one study, conducted in New Zealand in 2005, were startling enough to convince the researchers to suggest that medical doctors should aim to reduce the number of referrals for abortions in that country, simply on the grounds that the emotional trauma sustained by a woman undergoing an abortion was greater than any risk presented by carrying her baby to term and delivering the child. This study is notable because the lead researcher had no religious affiliation, was in fact an atheist, and remained pro-choice after the studies were concluded. Another study, conducted in 2003, showed that post-abortive woman were 63% more likely to undergo mental health treatment in the 90 days following an abortion, compared to following a delivery.

The proliferation of support groups for post-abortive mothers in recent years gives an indication of both the undeniable existence of and  the need for education about post-abortion syndrome. Many of these groups have been begun by women who felt traumatized by the experience of an abortion; an experience which was compounded by a lack of disclosure by medical authorities of the exact nature of abortion and its aftermath.

We live in times of great uncertainty and moral upheaval. A cult of selfishness has evolved throughout the Western world, and the utmost importance is placed on the notion of ‘convenience.’ Our society appears to have suspended its train of logic and waits with collective bated breath to be told by the media how to live and what to believe in next. Many lies are being perpetrated and one of the most damaging lies of our age is that there are no consequences to the intentional termination of an unborn baby’s life. But, in fact, there is much evidence to suggest that post-abortion syndrome is a common, if not inevitable experience for a woman who has chosen to abort her baby; we all have a right to hear more about it.